The Indian School on Magnolia Avenue | Tuba City Unified School District #15

The Indian School on Magnolia Avenue

The first collection of writings and images focused on an off-reservation Indian boarding school, The Indian School on Magnolia Avenue shares the fascinating story of this flagship institution, featuring the voices of American Indian students.

In 1902, the federal government opened Sherman Institute in Riverside, California, to transform American Indian students into productive farmers, carpenters, homemakers, nurses, cooks, and seamstresses. Indian students helped build the school and worked daily at Sherman; teachers provided vocational education and placed them in employment through the Outing Program.

Contributors to The Indian School on Magnolia Avenue have drawn on documents held at the Sherman Indian Museum to explore topics such as the building of Sherman, the school’s Mission architecture, the nursing program, the Special Five-Year Navajo Program, the Sherman cemetery, and a photo essay depicting life at the school.

Despite the fact that Indian boarding schools—with their agenda of cultural genocide— prevented students from speaking their languages, singing their songs, and practicing their religions, most students learned to read, write, and speak English, and most survived to benefit themselves and contribute to the well-being of Indian people.

Scholars and general readers in the fields of Native American studies, history, education, public policy, and historical photography will find The Indian School on Magnolia Avenue an indispensable volume.

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Storyteller

Leslie Marmon Silko’s groundbreaking book that blends original short stories and poetry influenced by the traditional oral tales that she heard growing up.
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An energetic Hopi woman emerges from a traditional family background to embrace the more conventional way of life in American today.
Ceremony

Ceremony

Thirty years since its original publication, Ceremony remains one of the most profound and moving works of Native American literature, a novel that is itself a ceremony of healing.
A Navajo Legacy

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Holiday describes how, at an early age, he began an apprenticeship with his grandfather to learn the Blessing Way ceremony.
No Turning Back

No Turning Back

Throughout her life this remarkable woman has held to the best in Hopi culture and has fought to maintain it in the lives of her students.

TCUSD is unified in culture, technology and its commitment to education; every stakeholder is prepared to achieve a lifetime of personal, cultural, civic excellence and to enrich the community.

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