Reclaiming Dine History

In this groundbreaking book, Navajo historian Jennifer Nez Denetdale seeks to rewrite the history of the Navajo, or Dine, people. Reared on the Navajo Nation in New Mexico and Arizona, Jennifer Nez Denetdale is the great-great-great-granddaughter of the well-known Navajo chief Manuelito (1816-1894) and his nearly unknown wife Juanita (1845-1910). Stimulated in part by seeing photographs of her ancestors, she began to explore her family history as a way of examining broader issues in Navajo historiography. Here she presents a thought-provoking examination of the construction of Dine history that underlines the dichotomy between Navajo and non-Navajo perspectives on the past. Book jacket., In this groundbreaking book, the first Navajo to earn a doctorate in history seeks to rewrite Navajo history. Reared on the Navajo Nation in New Mexico and Arizona, Jennifer Nez Denetdale is the great-great-great-granddaughter of a well-known Navajo chief, Manuelito (1816-1894), and his nearly unknown wife, Juanita (1845-1910). Stimulated in part by seeing photographs of these ancestors, she began to explore her family history as a way of examining broader issues in Navajo historiography. Here she presents a thought-provoking examination of the construction of the history of the Navajo people (Dine, in the Navajo language) that underlines the dichotomy between Navajo and non-Navajo perspectives on the Dine past. Reclaiming Dine History has two primary objectives. First, Denetdale interrogates histories that privilege Manuelito and marginalize Juanita in order to demonstrate some of the ways that writing about the Dine has been biased by non-Navajo views of assimilation and gender. Second, she reveals how Navajo narratives, including oral histories and stories kept by matrilineal clans, serve as vehicles to convey Navajo beliefs and values. By scrutinizing stories about Juanita, she both underscores the centrality of women’s roles in Navajo society and illustrates how oral tradition has been used to organize social units, connect Navajos to the land, and interpret the past. She argues that these same stories, read with an awareness of Navajo creation narratives, reveal previously unrecognized Navajo perspectives on the past. And she contends that a similarly culture-sensitive re-viewing of the Dine can lead to the production of a Navajo-centered history.

Storyteller

Storyteller

Leslie Marmon Silko’s groundbreaking book that blends original short stories and poetry influenced by the traditional oral tales that she heard growing up.
Me and Mine

Me and Mine

An energetic Hopi woman emerges from a traditional family background to embrace the more conventional way of life in American today.
Ceremony

Ceremony

Thirty years since its original publication, Ceremony remains one of the most profound and moving works of Native American literature, a novel that is itself a ceremony of healing.
A Navajo Legacy

A Navajo Legacy

Holiday describes how, at an early age, he began an apprenticeship with his grandfather to learn the Blessing Way ceremony.
No Turning Back

No Turning Back

Throughout her life this remarkable woman has held to the best in Hopi culture and has fought to maintain it in the lives of her students.

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